MB&F Horological Machine HM5 watch On the Road Again

Have a look at this thumping timepiece from MB&F which takes its design cues from the much acclaimed Lamborghini Miura of the early 1970’s and is a bit different from the C3H5N3o9 watch theme. Unlike any other watch that has been featured here, this one truly stands out from the crowd with its unique dial and streamlined design that is irresistible. This is the fifth limited edition Horological Machine on offering by MB&F called HM5 On the Road Again, which also looks inspired from the era of 1970’s. The bi-directional (to set tie both forward and backwards) hour and minute displays have the indications inversed and reflected 90 degrees (using a sapphire reflective prism) in the vertical direction with a magnification (using a lens) of 20% making it look ultra-futuristic.

Just like a supercar the watch also has rear exhaust but it expels water, that is in case it gets wet the watch has a mechanism that drains it out of the two rear-end openings. The automatic movement based on gear train Sowind, features 22k gold battle-axe shaped mystery winding rotor with hand-finished bridges. This provides 42 hours of watch movement reserve having 28,800 vibrations per hour. The glass in front is dark tinted so that one can see time arriving and departing and the numbers have light-green outline replicating the glowing lights of a supercar burning up the roads in night time.

The HM5 watch is limited to only 66 pieces and comes in a zirconium case with a price tag of 54,000 Swiss franc (US 58309 dollars).

# MB&F Press Release:

Horological Machine No5 On the Road Again

HM5 On the Road Again may appear relatively simple, but it’s complicated: the hour and minute displays look straightforward, but they are bi-directional jumping hours with indications inversed, reflected 90° to the vertical and magnified 20%; HM5 has a futuristic case design, but it’s from the 1970s; the case of HM5 is not water resistant, but its movement is; HM5 has a modern automatic winding mechanical movement, but it was inspired by an era when quartz was King; the rear louvres on supercars block light, but on HM5 they let it in; HM5 has exhaust pipes, but they drain water; HM5 is On the Road Again, but its inspiration barely left the garage.

The last decade or two have seen an exponential growth in inventions that have revolutionised our lives. Robots may not cook dinner, but they can build cars, vacuum the home and mow the lawn. Sending a man to Mars is not a question of if, but when.

But imagine the exciting anticipation of the future in the early 1970s with the arrival of supercars, hovercrafts, supersonic Concords, Apollo moon landings; and high-precision quartz watches. Everything seemed possible: humanoid robots, jet-packs and flying cars. In the 1970s the future wasn’t tomorrow, it was today!

“Imagine telling somebody in 1972 that in 2012, most people would be wearing round watches with round dials and three hands. That would sound crazier and more far-fetched than the idea of living on Mars!” Maximilian Büsser

In 1972, one plucky watch brand, Amida, decided to take on the quartz usurpers at their own game with the Digitrend, which featured a fashionably futuristic tapered case and vertical digital LED-look display powered by a mechanical movement. It looked just like a cutting-edge quartz watch and it eventually became an iconic timepiece. Unfortunately, appreciation came too late to save Amida.

The unmistakable wedge-shaped case of On the Road Again is direct homage to the daring Amida Digitrend. However, it also takes unmistakable cues from the sleek low-slung supercars of the epoch, with louvres on their near horizontal rear windows blocking sunlight and heat. Conversely, the slide operated louvres on HM5 open to allow light in to charge on the Super-LumiNova numbers on the time disks.

Another distinguishing feature of supercars are throaty exhaust pipes. HM5 has dual exhausts to drain water, in case – like James Bond’s Lotus in ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’ – HM5 gets wet. An inner water-resistant case keeps HM5’s Engine nice and dry.

An optical grade sapphire prism reflects the horizontal hour and minutes so that they display vertically and a convex lens magnifies the numeral by 20% for improved legibility. The vertical forward-facing display makes HM5 an excellent driver’s watch as there is no need to lift your wrist from the steering wheel to read the display.

HM5 takes these 1970s icons and now, 40 years into the future, puts them On the Road Again.

Gaurav

Hailing from the northern region of India, Gaurav Sood has a profound liking for everything upbeat in the cloud and a vision to acquaint geek readers with the latest technology news. Having Master’s degree in information technology, along with the associative writing skills to shape up technology related content on latest innovations make him a crisp writer.Gaurav likes to observe nature, write thought provoking quotes, travel places, driving cars and play video games when things get too boring. And his food for thought on scrambling up succinct articles on the internet comes from his love for ambient music scores.

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