Eye tracking wheelchair developed by Imperial College London researchers

Eye tracking wheelchair developed by Imperial College London researchers

So far, we have seen so many tech savvy wheelchairs that help paraplegics to commute from one place to another without much hassle. There have been quite a handful attempts to develop wheelchairs that propel forward just by the user’s eye movement, but one inherent problem in such wheelchairs is the lack of ability to identify when the user actually wants to move in that direction. To overcome this quandary, Aldo Faisal and his colleagues at Imperial College London have developed an eye tracking wheelchair which is connected to a pair of cameras that detect the user’s intention of eye movement.

According to Faisal, the software of its computer is connected to the cameras that can tell precisely when a person wants to move forward or just looking at someone in the distance. The complex algorithms detect the eye movement in just 10 milliseconds, and then in another 10 milliseconds makes the decision to initiate the requisite movement. This short time just feels instantaneous, and thereby, seems as if the wheelchair is moving to the will of your eyes in the blink of an eye.

Eye tracking wheelchair developed by Imperial College London researchers

This kind of wheelchair will help multiple sclerosis or spinal cord injury patients with severe paralysis, since their eye movement is controlled by the brain. The technology can also be used for eye-controlled applications where the user can move an object or perhaps a robotic figure just by guiding them with their eyes.

Eye tracking wheelchair developed by Imperial College London researchers

Credit: Reuters Source: Imperial

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Gaurav

Hailing from the northern region of India, Gaurav has a profound liking for everything upbeat in the cloud and vision to acquaint readers with the latest technology news. He likes to observe nature, write thought provoking quotes, travel places, drive cars and play video games when things get too boring. And his food for thought comes from ambient music scores he listens to.

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