Fluid-based micro implant promises to restore vision ceased by Glaucoma

Miniature pump regulates internal ocular pressure

Researchers at Fraunhofer University have given us enough reasons in the past to believe technology has the ability to put things right. In a recent development, researchers at the University are working on an implantable micro-fuild pump which would effectively be placed in the eye to treat ocular pressure and restore vision. There are various eye ailments which create elevate or reduce pressure in the eye and lead to diminishing vision, in intense cases even leading to blindness. There have been no real solutions for such problems that include Gluacoma and Phthisis bulbi.

Gluacoma is damage caused to the optic nerve, generally due to intense high intraocular pressure. This excessive pressure in the eye if left untreated can damage the optic nerve and result in loss of vision. Phthisis bulbi is a situation when the eyeball shrinks. This usually happens because of ceased aqueous humor (fluid that nourishes cornea and the lens and keeps eye in shape). Shortage of nutrition by the aqueous damages the cornea resulting in vision loss or blindness.

There are available treatments for both Gluacoma and Phthisis bulbi, but the treatments work on simply slowing the damage to the eye. These solutions do not reverse the symptoms. In response, Fraunhofer researches are devising an implant which when inserted in the eye would regulate fluids and pressure to correct vision over time.

The implant comprises a microscopic silicon micro-membrane pump with sensors, battery and telemetry module and is capable of producing almost 30 micro liters of fluid a second. Since, the implant can produce fluid; it can keep the eye moist. Moreover, the implant can be set by the physician to produce fluid, which means it can deliver the fluid in a manner the eye does and can hopefully treat the eye for sever conditions like Gluacoma and Phthisis bulbi.

Via: Gizmag

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Bharat

Bharat writes about latest gadgets, toys, robots and new technologies across various platforms. In addition to reporting and reviewing new products and technologies, he spends too much time digging the internet for endless questions. He's a die-hard football fan and a big foodie who wants to host Man v. Food some day.

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