Blind mothers can now feel unborn child’s features, thanks to 3D printing

in Utero 3D printed baby scan

Nothing can be more awe-aspiring than seeing the magic of nature unfold inside the mother’s womb. Yes, I’m talking about the phase when parents start seeing the development of legs, arms, head and other body parts of their baby, visible through an ultrasound scan. But what if a parent is blind and can’t see the magic unfolding? That is quite an unfortunate situation, and thankfully In utero 3D, a startup from Szczecin, Poland has a solution. They create bas-relief of an unborn child based on the 3D ultrasound examination, isn’t that amazing?

Szczecin puts a lot of time and effort into developing these exact three dimensional representations of a child’s features and the environment inside mother’s womb. It takes quite a lot of work in creating the model of the unborn child’s bas-relief, and thereafter 3D printing takes around 4-7 hours. You can very well imagine the kind of accuracy put into developing the 3D printed model which is a 1:1 scale model.

Technology indeed can do magic, and in this case it gives blind mothers a chance to touch and feel their baby even before it is born. The firm gives all the mothers/fathers this unique opportunity to embrace their unborn child in a manner that was not possible before the advent of 3D printing technology.

You can also get your baby’s exact 3D printed replica by jumping straight over to the official website.

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Via: 3Ders

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Gaurav

Hailing from the northern region of India, Gaurav has a profound liking for everything upbeat in the cloud and vision to acquaint readers with the latest technology news. He likes to observe nature, write thought provoking quotes, travel places, drive cars and play video games when things get too boring. And his food for thought comes from ambient music scores he listens to.

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