Tagged: Bandage

Smart Bandage capable of detecting bedsores at a very early stage

Smart Bandage that detects bedsores and ulcers UC Berkeley

Bedsores and ulcers can be a real irritation for bed-ridden people, and they are very painful indeed. To counter this problem Engineers at UC Berkeley and researchers at UCSF are in the phase of developing a Smart Bandage that detects underlying development of bedsores at a very early stage. The development of this Smart Bandage is undertaken by UC Berkeley researchers who devised the software and hardware of the bandage, while UCSF carried out all the initial animal trials. Smart Bandage uses electrical signals (impedance spectroscopy) to detect tissue development under the skin for curing bedsores or ulcers at their root level.
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Electronic skin – Health monitoring skin patch capable of administering drugs automatically

Wearable electronic skin patch for health monitoring

Korean researchers have developed a wearable sensor device called Electronic Skin which is capable of monitoring and treating muscle disorders in people suffering from Parkinson or epilepsy. This wearable health monitoring device looks like a small adhesive bandage that has nano-circuitry embedded over it. As described in a paper published on this nanotechnology monitor, this small adhesive bandage can be worn on the wrist, as it continuously monitors physiological activity for one week and then the medication embedded in a silica interface is automatically administered through this flexible electronic device by diffusion-driven release of drug molecules through the skin. The silicon nanomemebrane sensors detect changes in electrical resistance to indicate a fast tremor or certain problem with the patient wearing it.
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Spray-on bandage capable of protecting and healing serious wounds

Spray on bandage

Spray-on a surgical bandage and your wound would be dressed to perfection. Working on a new medical project, researchers from the University of Maryland have made a spray-on bandage that is made from biodegradable material which takes the shape of the wounded body part, protecting it from any kind of infections. First the researchers used commercial airbrush to spray-on the biodegradable bandage but then they decide to use a biodegradable polymer called poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid)-PLGA in a mixture of acetone to achieve the desired result. The spray-on bandage can lay fibers of diameter 370 nanometers and as soon as you spray the bandage onto the affected area, the acetone content in it evaporates.
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