Tagged: Cardboard camera

Creative cardboard creations put together in a gripping collection

Creative cardboard creations put together in a gripping collection

Cardboard as a material has structural strength to hold the heaviest of cargo and at the same time flexibility to be used according to your needs. It comes handy as a raw material for school projects, but a few genius artists can turn it into work of art. In the hand of a master craftsman who are blessed with the technical bend of mind, cardboard can be turned into jaw-dropping creations. As our dedication to such artistic people and of course the cardboard material that makes it all possible, here is a collection of the best cardboard creations that’ll you’ll ever see.
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DIY Nikon SLR Cardboard Camera made from recycled material

Cardboard camera

For photograph fanatics Marta Crass has created a replica Nikon SLR just from cardboard and recycled material. Being hand cut without the use of any precision machining tools like laser cutting machine or plotter, the Cardboard Camera resembles the real thing very closely. Measuring 6.5” x 4.5” in length and height respectively the replica camera is an emulation of the 1960’s era Nikon camera of her grandfather. Although it can take no pictures and is rendered useless once it drops in the water, this replica camera made from cardboard is geekishly cool and can be yours for $150. If that price is too high for you then the best thing you can do is to enjoy it in pictures or set out on making one for yourself from the visual clues you have.
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DIY cardboard camera by Coralie Gourguechon

DIY cardboard camera by Coralie Gourguechon

Making your own DIY camera surely seems an interesting activity and you can also venture out on it. Coralie Gourguechon has created the DIY Craft Camera which is made from a cardboard and the digital camera which has an electronic system powered by an Arduino. The whole thing is controlled by an open single-board micro-controller and since the project is open source one, so a bit geeky users can make their own modifications to the make. The photos are stored on a memory card that can then be later on transferred on a computer. The project was completed with the help of hackerspace Tetalab and Scootlab society for the electronic parts, and Graphic Designer Laura Messaglio for the visual communication.
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