Tagged: device

Heartbeat-powered, Swiss watch-style device will power pacemakers of tomorrow

 

watch like pacemaker battery

On the tune of automatic watches that harvest power from movement of the wrist, researchers have developed a wristwatch-style device, which will power pacemakers by drawing power from the heart itself. The smartwatch-style device is created by two researchers – Andreas Haeberlin and Adrian Zurbuchen from the University of Bern and Michigan respectively. Read More…

Stamp-sized, sun-powered device purifies water in minutes

Stamp-sized water disinfecting device

People in many parts of the world cleanse water by leaving it in plastic bottle for long hours under the sun to let UV rays kill microbes. Since, this is a very time consuming process (UV rays, that form only 4 percent of the sun’s total energy, can take up to a couple of days to purify water), engineers at the Stanford University and SLAC National Laboratory have noticed the problem and have developed a small device that works on the energy of the sun to kill 99.99 percent germs in water in only 20 minutes. Read More…

Liverty lets you keep track of Facebook notifications in physical display format

So you are watching a movie and want to keep a track of the new notifications on Facebook because it is an addiction for you? Then here is one product that will soon be out for purchase that solves this problem by showing a physical display of the number of updates even when you haven’t opened Facebook on your desktop or phone. Liverty (Like Real) project has got through the initial phase of funding and looks all set for production so that you can keep track of Facebook updates or number updates from other websites (such as social media websites) as well in a physical display format. The device connects to the USB cable and Ethernet cable so that data can be retrieved and then displayed in real time.
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Japanese device robotic rings, setting up a wonderful future of wearable robots

When it’s about the spookiest of researches, we always hand it out to the Japanese, consider otherwise – well Keio University’s latest robot rings are just perfect to affirm our case. The rings are made to mimic the eyes and mouth movement, and like all ordinary rings are made to be worn on the fingers. When worn on the hand the robot serves as a medium of communication with the basic idea of enhancing animal-like, imitation that we make with our hands.
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