Tagged: Gesture Control

BMW to debut HoloActive Touch, holographic-style interiors at CES 2017

BMW is the top line automaker that is focusing intensely on in-car technologies and user interface we are most likely to see in future automobiles. After having bewildered the world with the AirTouch technology at the CES 2016, BMW is slated to introduce a new HoloActive Touch system at the Consumer Electronics Show 2017, which promises to be a nifty sci-fiish integration to its vehicles. Read More…

Portable Bixi lets you command multiple smart devices through gestures

Bixi Touch Free Control

We have been watching fabulous and highly advanced lab of Tony Stark in which he controls every device or interface with swift in-air-hand gestures. Electronic manufactures are on it to make gesture-control a reality. Bixi is the new candidate offering touch-free and wireless control of Internet of Things devices and gadgets by processing user’s intuitive hand-gestures. The developers have synthesized the technology into a small, portable hexagonal device. It can control multiple devices like controlling smart-phones, displays, e-book readers, smart-home functions and Apps including Spotify, Ibooks, Youtube etc.  using FITTT Channel. Read More…

VTouch gesture-based interactive displays for cars to arrive in 2017    

VTouch gesture based display

Introduction of user-friendly digital displays and interfaces in automotive industry begun a decade ago. Currently, exotic-looking heads-up displays are available in high-end vehicles like BMW or Tesla. However, Seoul-based startup VTouch now claims to make gesture-based interactive displays commercially available for low-end automakers by the end of 2017. Read More…

Microsoft’s ATL believes gesture control is the future of VR

Gesture control future of Virtual Reality

You hold up your wallet and the door opens, the lights come on as you step into the room, your computer unlocks at your approach and locks when you nip to the loo where you flush, wash and dry without having to touch anything.  Gesture control is already with us, isn’t it?  Well not quite, because those actions I’ve just described are single sensor responses. When you have a machine that recognises and responds to a sequence of gestures, that can in effect read a gesture language and respond appropriately, then you are talking about a sensing and computing device that has an ‘intelligence.’

Read More…

Amputee gets a gesture controlled robotic prosthetic arm

Johns Hopkins University Myo controlled prosthetic arm

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have used the awesome muscle sensing Myo armband to control a robotic prosthetic arm – turning the prosthetic arm into a gesture controlled arm that works without electronics. Using the prosthetic arm and the Myo armband, patients can control the arm as they think.  A pair of Myo armbands is used on the upper arm, which detects electric impulses in the arm muscles to wirelessly transmit them to a computer nearby. The computer understands these movements and commands the connected prosthetic arm to execute the task. Watch Myo controlled prosthetic arm in action below.  Read More…

Apple Watch patent promises exchange of information and data with a handshake

Apple Watch gesture based information exchange

There is no reason why Apple shouldn’t brag about its AirDrop feature that makes NFC look ordinary. But unfortunately the service isn’t viable enough to function on the Apple Watch smartwatch due to small screen size and hardware constraints. However Apple is now looking to patch that loophole and it is apparent from a patent filed for exchange of information between two Apple Watches without much fuzz. This patent is all about exchange of personal information or files by simple gestures like a handshake or high five.
Read More…

Aria clip-on module ensures your smartwatch is gesture controlled

Aria gesture control for smartwatches

Back in 2010, Microsoft first introduced gesture controls in mainstream with the Kinect, followed by Leap Motion doing the same for personal computers a few years later. Now, a startup called Deus Ex Technology visions to bring gesture controls to the smartest new device – the smartwatches through a novel device called Aria. Aria is a module that can fit any smartwatch band and act as a gesture controller for the smart timepiece. Allowing you to control smartwatch with finger gestures means, you can control the watch even when your other hand is busy – you flick through applications on the watch with the same hand you have the watch on.   Read More…

CEATEC 2014: 16Lab unveils one-of-its-kind smart ring computer

16labs-ring-computer

CEATEC 2014 is here to feed the tech frenzy. The electronic event scheduled towards the end of the year serves as a platform for companies in the Far East to showcase products that they would bring amid us for Christmas or later. 16Lab is one name that has really amazed us on the first day of the event. The Japanese manufacturer has unveiled a working prototype of a ring-like wearable computing device, which would work as an e-wallet, alert tool, gesture controller and maybe a non-contact key. Read More…

Microsoft Research working on smart stylus & tablet that preempt your intent

Digital pen stylus and tablet by Microsoft Research

Microsoft Research has been working on quite a few new technologies including the flexible input display introduced yesterday. Now, they have revealed a very futuristic stylus that you can call a smart stylus, since it knows how it is being held and how the user intends to use it. Taking human-computer interaction to the next level, the team headed by Bill Buxton and Ken Hinckley at Microsoft Research (MSR) along with researchers from Cornell University and the University of Manitoba to create a tablet and stylus that closely analyses every detail using inertial sensors. Read More…

SideSwipe will let you control your phone with in-air hand gestures

SideSwipe

Are you looking for an alternative way to use your phone because you’re sick of the buttons and touchscreens? For your love, researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have developed a way to control your smartphone with in-air gestures above and around the device. The novel system called SideSwipe will be that unique and interesting way, you always wanted, to let you interact with the phone without using touchscreens or physical buttons. Read More…