Tagged: Med gadget

Heartbeat-powered, Swiss watch-style device will power pacemakers of tomorrow

 

watch like pacemaker battery

On the tune of automatic watches that harvest power from movement of the wrist, researchers have developed a wristwatch-style device, which will power pacemakers by drawing power from the heart itself. The smartwatch-style device is created by two researchers – Andreas Haeberlin and Adrian Zurbuchen from the University of Bern and Michigan respectively. Read More…

This USB stick is also your personal HIV testing device

USB HIV device

In the developing countries, HIV/AIDS is still a taboo more than it is a disease. Many people still feel skeptical in visiting hospitals and health centers for blood tests to diagnose HIV. To change that, and to make certain that more and more people can effortlessly get their HIV tests done; researchers at the Imperial College London have teamed with DNA Electronics to develop a USB stick that doubles as an at-home HIV testing device.   Read More…

Auris Surgical’s ARES is first robot bronchoscope approved by FDA

ARES bronchoscope robot

Robots are making their way into just about everything and next generation of robots are going to be surgical robots that will help ease pressure on doctors. Auris Surgical, a technology startup in the Silicon Valley is working on one such breakthrough surgical robot called the ARES (Auris Robotic Endoscopy System), which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The remote controlled ARES robot was approved by FDA as a bronchoscope in May to view and treat lung conditions. Read More…

Engineer father builds artificial pancreas for his Type 1 diabetic son

Artificial Pancreas Andrew Calabrese

According to American Diabetes Association almost 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. This estimated figure includes considerable number of Type 1 diabetes cases. Type 1 diabetes (condition where pancreas stop producing insulin) is diagnosed more in young children and third-grader Andrew Calabrese is just one of them. Since, Andrew was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and his pancreas gave up on him, his parents have wanted to do anything possible to make his battle with diabetes less disturbing. While Andrew’s mother Heidi set up a social support group to connect with other people and families battling the life-changing disease, his father Jason (software engineer by profession) built Andrew robotic pancreas that’ll help regulate his insulin levels. Read More…

3D printed mouthpiece that cures sleep apnoea

3D printed Mouthpiece treats sleep apnoea

In order to better existing devices designed to tackle sleep apnoea, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization researchers have combined with dental company Oventus in Australia to create a 3D printed mouthpiece to prevent people from threatening pauses in breath while sleeping. While present anti-sleep apnoea devices are made to push the lower jaw forward to open airway into the mouth, the new 3D printed mouthpiece has a duckbill and extends from the mouth like a whistle. It is divided into two different airways that lead air back to the throat without the hindrance of blocked nose or tongue. Read More…

Brainsway’s TMS Helmet uses magnets to treat depression

Developed by Brainsway the TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation) Helmet is a non-invasive treatment for clinical depression, schizophrenia, Parkinson’s and stress related disorders. This unique helmet which treats depression etc with the use of magnets has been already approved in Europe and has lately received the approval of United States Food and Drug Administration. The device is hailed as an alternative to antidepressants is embedded with electromagnetic coils which send magnetic pulses to activate the neurons in deep inside the brain structure. Read More…

100BPM is a life saver when someone needs CPR and medics are not around

Giving CPR to a person in trouble due to cardiac arrest can be the difference between life and death. But as a bystandard if you haven’t done it before or have had little experience in doing so, the success rate can be sadly minimalistic. To solve this problem Natalie Vanns (Product Designer) Shivanjali Tomar (Interaction Designer) and Doris Feurstein (Interaction Designer) have created a product called 100BPM, a simplified chest compression product which apparently won the Reddot Design Award 2012. This Compression-Only CPR method involves no mouth to mouth resuscitation and only requires chest compressions which are conveyed through a light showing the user how much push indicated by yellow (too shallow), green (correct pressure) or red (too deep). The product also gives voice commands to keep the user motivated to push on in a pressure situation when someone’s life is at stake.
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