Tagged: Prosthetic

Bionic Nerf gun arm gives direction to an amputee’s shooting ability

What if you’re a Nerf Gun fan and you have hacker friends? Well, if you’re Nicolas Huchet, you can get a bionic Nerf Gun. A team of hackers called Hackerloop, based out of Paris and New York, has developed a bionic Nerf Gun for Nicolas who was left with a myoelectric prosthetic hand after an accident. The gun is designed to attach to an amputated arm and fire with muscle contraction. Read More…

US students 3D printed prosthetic hand for a Scottish teenager

3D prosthetic hand

When a viable prosthetic hand cost approximately £30,000, a fully-functional 3D printed prosthetic hand for only £40 is simply unimaginable. A team of science students from West Brook High School in Beaumont, Texas, USA have really made the impossible possible. The team has 3D printed a prosthetic hand that costs less than £40 for Caleb Morrison, a 16-year-old from East Kilbride in Scotland. Caleb was born without right wrist and hand. Earlier, Caleb was using a basic prosthetic arm but he is really excited to use the new 3D printed hand that reached him a week before Christmas. Read More…

Indian engineers build low cost 3D-Printed robotic hand that is lighter, more efficient

indian-engineers buids 3D-printed hand

As 3D-printing technology is achieving more perfection, the day isn’t far when amputees would be able to regain their mobility as well as functionality through brain-controlled complex prosthetic exactly like real limbs. A team of Indian engineers claims to have invented a 3D-Printed prosthetic hand that is way far efficient and affordable than currently available prosthetic in the market. The team from the Amrita University in India showcased its innovation at the tree-day International Robotics and Automation for Humanitarian Application (RAHA 2016) at Amrita University in Kollam, Kerala in India.

Read More…

Philip the duck gets 3D printed flippers to walk again comfortably

Philip Duck 3D printed flippers

Any act of kindness towards animals shows that humanity is still alive and kicking. Although such people are not banking on any karma points, it surely doesn’t go unnoticed I’m sure. This time around it is a poor little duck that gets a pair of 3D printed flippers from god sent angels to get a new lease of life. After getting the flippers damaged due to frostbite during the harsh Wisconsin winter, Phillip the duck got a pair of new ones thanks to 3D printing technology.
Read More…

Innovation award for Lego prosthetic arm that lets children design their own hand

 IKO-prosthetic-system-by-Carlos-Arturo-Torres

It’s not the kids alone who are appreciative of the IKO Creative Prosthetic System. Jury at the prestigious digital technology summit Netexplo organized in Paris was equally approving and awarded the Lego prosthetic arm, which disabled children can customize to their need, with an innovation award.  The Lego prosthetic system designed by Colombian designer Carlos Arturo Torres of the UMEA Institute of design that allows children to custom build their own Lego accessories won the Grand Prix award at the event.  Read More…

Amputee gets a gesture controlled robotic prosthetic arm

Johns Hopkins University Myo controlled prosthetic arm

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have used the awesome muscle sensing Myo armband to control a robotic prosthetic arm – turning the prosthetic arm into a gesture controlled arm that works without electronics. Using the prosthetic arm and the Myo armband, patients can control the arm as they think.  A pair of Myo armbands is used on the upper arm, which detects electric impulses in the arm muscles to wirelessly transmit them to a computer nearby. The computer understands these movements and commands the connected prosthetic arm to execute the task. Watch Myo controlled prosthetic arm in action below.  Read More…

Kid gets 3D printed bionic hand just in time for Christmas

Lucas Abraham gets 3D printed bionic hand

Lucas Abraham gets 3D printed bionic hand

Six-year-old Lucas Abraham who was born without fingers on his right hand always wanted to have a robo hand that would help him in his daily chores of life. Thanks to 3D printing technology and the will of University of Louisville graduate students, Lucas has got the best Christmas gift ever. A 3D printed bionic hand in three different versions, one of which glows in the dark. It took the students a month’s time to develop this artificial hand, just in time for Lucas to show it off at the first day of his first grade at Bowen Elementary School.


Read More…

Lego prosthetic arm for kids that doubles as a tool to play with

IKO prosthetic system by Carlos Arturo Torres from the UMEA Institute of design

The thought of hooking on prosthetic limb can be sometimes mentally stressing for kids. It is related to self-esteem and the bad perception that kids have around artificial arms. That is what Carlos Arturo Torres from the UMEA Institute of design believed and wanted to fix as soon as possible. Hence he came-up with the idea of IKO prosthetic system (in collaboration with Lego FutureLab and CIREC) that gives disabled kids the freedom to let loose their creativity and use their prosthetic as a child’s play. In-fact it releases them from any negative thoughts and also attracts attention of other kids who just want to get the chance to play with this cool Lego prosthetic.
Read More…

First prototype of RoboLeg, a 3D printed robotic leg unveiled

3D printed robotic leg

Living by the passion of developing 3D-printed robotic prosthesis for patients who cannot afford the really expensive robotic prosthesis already available, carpenter Richard Van As and prop-maker Ivan Owen have recently released the first prototype of RoboLeg – a 3D printed robotic leg. The developer duo have previous been made famous with their creations including a robotic 3D-printed hand, 3D printed robotic arm and 3D printed robotic finger. Dubbed the Robohand, Roboarm and Robofinger respectively, the 3D files and assembling instructions of each are available for download on Thingiverse. Read More…