Tagged: Research

Finger swipes on phone screen will power its guts – MSU’s innovation for energizing gadgets

MSU innovation

The need for finding an endless resource to power new day gadgets is the craving of every leading research center in the world. That one magic material which will provide us with an abundant resource of power, enough to keep our gadgets charged for weeks even months. Well, Michigan State University engineering researchers have taken a detour and come-up with an ingenious way to charge phones, and could pave way for future mobile device charging mechanisms.
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MIT’s MoVR system cuts the cord in virtual reality

wireless-vr-headset using MoVR

Virtual Reality is all the rage; it’s the next best thing to wearables and it’s being used for everything from gaming and entertainment to medicine. Sadly, VR tech is still in its infancy and is limited to PC’s periphery – almost all VR headset require to be tethered to a computer system to enjoy the immersive experience. Since, ability to go cordless can help better immersive experience and open new applications for virtual reality headsets; researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed MoVR system that allows any VR headset to be used wirelessly. Read More…

In a breakthrough scientists induce superconductivity in non-superconductive material

Superconductive alcium iron arsenide

Researchers at the University of Houston claim a major breakthrough in the field of super-conductivity. The researchers are hopeful of enhancing current superconductive materials using the findings of the new study. While existing superconductors require to be cooled down to a temperature of about -270 Degree Celsius, the researchers have induced superconductivity in non-superconducting materials by working on a decade old phenomenon. Read More…

MIT researchers create liquid battery that uses gravity to generate energy

MIT liquid battery uses gravity to generate power

The concept of liquid flow batteries is not new, such batteries have been around in some form since the 1970s. Taking an inspiration from these, researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are building a new, revolutionary liquid battery that uses gravity to generate power. According to the paper published in the Energy and Environmental Science journal, MIT researches suggest, the new battery will work on the principle of an hourglass and should be available as a power solution for applications across a range of industries soon. Read More…

German researchers develop salt grain-sized 3D printed camera

salt grain-sized 3D printed camera

Team of PhD students led by Timo Gissibl and Simon Thiele at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, have developed a salt grain-sized camera, which could one day change the future of imaging in health and security. The camera is 3D printed, and it is small enough to fit into a standard syringe needle. Interestingly, the camera is fitted with a LED and three lenses and is attached to a 5.6 foot optical fiber that is just equal to the width of two hair strands. Read More…

Lightweight, wearable soft exosuit to help stroke patients rewalk

soft-exosuit

Exoskeletons or exosuits currently marketed are rigid metal frames that are bulky for patients with disabilities. To ease out the bulk and with the idea to make an exosuit that’s flexible and soft, engineers at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have developed The Soft Exosuit. First-of-its-kind soft wearable robot is designed to assist wearer’s movements with lightweight and flexible exoskeleton. To accelerate development process of the soft exosuit, Wyss Institute has collaborated with ReWalk Robotics, a collaboration that hints at a positive future where stroke patients or anyone with lower limb mobility limitation would regain mobility. Read More…

Researchers devise lip reading technology to make sense of videos lacking sound

lip reading technology

Reading lips to decode what words footballers have been shouting in the heat of the moment on pitch or what an offender said in CCTV footage is essential for investigation. Lip reading is helpful in situations when video is available but there is no audio. To make lip-reading technology more full-proof, researchers at the University of East Anglia have developed visual speech recognition technology which could someday help in communication with hearing impaired or in forensics where decoding lip movement is essential as sound is not available. Read More…

SCAMP robot flies like a drone, climb vertical walls like a spider

SCAMP-robot-1

Robots are going to outpace humans in almost all departments. They are already more reliable, more intelligent and better at sports. Enter SCAMP, and now they’ll be better at flying and climbing skyscrapers too. Stanford Climbing and Aerial Maneuvering Platform or SCAMP is part drone part wall climbing robot, which can fly in the air with help of its quadrotors, land on vertical walls and then climbs them with ease using its spiny feet. Read More…

MIT researchers create bio-skin that reacts to sweat, suggests future of self-ventilating clothes  

MIT BioLogic

Researchers at Tangible Media Group at MIT Media Lab, led by PhD student Lining Yao, are using ancient bacteria to create synthetic material called BioLogic, which moves, expands and contracts when it is exposed to moisture. The bacteria discovered some 1000 years back in Japan is called Bacillus Subtilis natto. While testing various microorganisms in the lab, Lining Yao discovered that natto bacteria expanded and contracted when exposed to moisture – this is when she was struck with the idea to try and use this bacterium to act like a machine instead of an unpredictable organism.   Read More…

MIT researches can see through walls using RF signals

MIT-RF-Capture can see through walls

MIT researches are always on their toes working on breathtaking technologies that most of us don’t even think can ever exist. Case in point, RF-Capture – a device that captures human figures through walls with near perfect accuracy. Developed by scientists at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the RF-Capture can transfer wireless signals to reconstruct a human figure and then analyze these signal reflections. Using the device, researchers claim, they can literally see through walls and identify which person is standing behind it and what the person is doing. Read More…